Golf & Country Club by Charles Wendehack

Most books in the golfer’s library are written about golfers, tournaments, course architecture, or about the game’s rich history. Not so with the subject of this month’s featured book. A unique and collectible volume to complete the canon a golfer’s library is Golf & Country Clubs (D & J W8650), written by an architect, although not one that designed courses. Rather, Clifford Charles Wendehack was a building architect, and his book’s subtitle: A Survey of the Requirement of Planning Construction and Equipment of the Modern Club House gives a clue that the audience is for architects and not for the lay person.

wendehack

The actual technical title of the book is: GOLF & COVNTRY CLVBS: A SVRVEY OF THE REQVIREMENT OF PLANNING CONSTRVCTION AND EQVIPMENT OF THE MODERN CLVB HOVSE. For some reason Wendehack, and his publisher William Helburn, Inc. chose to use the old Latin convention of the letter “V” instead of the letter “U”. He also seems to have had an affinity for Roman Numerals, as the first fifty-one pages of the book are numbered using them. This front section of the book is targeted toward practicing architects and gives practical advice on how to design and layout buildings, how to save costs, and the pros and cons of various methods of design.

Wendehack begins the large format book with a bold statement. He feels there were only two distinctly American forms of architecture: the skyscraper and the modern golf and country club building; his analysis was that all other building types had clearly evolved from European architecture. Written just before the stock market crash in 1929, the book has an unmistakable Roaring Twenties feel to it as he espouses the good times and the popularity of golf, “…it is a frequent occurrence for crowds to be assembled at daybreak in their anxiety lest they miss their opportunity to play their favorite sport.”

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Interior of Maidstone clubhouse, East Hampton

The heart of the book from the point of view of the collector or historian are the 157 black and white plates that comprise most of the book. They contain fabulous illustrations and images from the interior of many historic clubs including the Maidstone Club in East Hampton, the Gulf Stream Golf Club in Florida and the Longue Vue Country Club in Pittsburgh. Of particular note are clubhouses that no longer exist, including the original Fishers Island clubhouse in New York and the clubhouse of the Oakland Golf Course (a Seth Raynor design) on Long Island.

Wendehack was a New Yorker whose practice was based on Park Avenue; he studied architecture in Europe for a number of years, thus his ability to continually refer to various historic building types with first-hand knowledge throughout the book. In addition to his focus on designing buildings for country clubs, Wendehack’s architectural practice also designed homes for individuals.

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Fishers Island Club original clubhouse

Writing about the grill room he feels that it is, “undoubtedly the survival of the old English Inn or chop house so amusingly immortalized by Dickens in his ‘Pickwick Papers’.” He spends considerable time discussing how to design a grill room and feels that a large fireplace and ‘hearthstone’ is the key. Wendehack’s most famous work is Winged Foot’s clubhouse and he gives it the full treatment in the book (seen below, shortly after opening). Anyone who has had the pleasure of sitting in the majestic and oversized Winged Foot grill room, with the fire roaring on a crisp fall day will need no further explanation as to why the buildings Wendehack designed represent the pinnacle of what his profession can deliver.

His approach to writing is quite philosophical at times; he alternatively quotes Socrates and Confucius and refers often to ancient Rome and Greece. He also seems hooked on the virtues of golf: “As an economic necessity to preserve our health and sanity, therefore, we are realizing that more time should be spent out of doors. The open country of the golf course increases our perspective, permits us to measure ourselves as well as our fellowmen by the yard stick of life. So in these oases of business activity, we are erecting in increasing numbers, modern temples of sport; shrines at which we worship and obtain a better understanding of the human side of our fellowmen, and perhaps more than suspected, God Himself through the glories of nature.”

DSCF9287Winged Foot’s clubhouse shortly after opening

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Crossing Country Club, Trenton, NJ from Golf and Country Clubs

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About valuablebook

Valuable Book Group specializes in rare, collectible and valuable golf books. We are avid collectors ourselves obsessed not only with playing the game, but also its history and the literature of the game.
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